ASHBY ST MARY PARISH COUNCIL

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WALKED  THE 
 ASHBY  WALK?  In Handbook



HISTORY

BACKGROUND  
 

The parish of Ashby St Mary is situated in the county of Norfolk in the region of England known as East Anglia.   It is one of 118 towns and parishes within the local authority area of South Norfolk District Council.
The parish lies approximately 7 miles south east of the city of Norwich. The village is bordered by Thurton, Claxton, Bergh Apton and Carleton St Peter.  It is located to the north east of the A146 road that extends from Norwich to the most easterly point in England at Lowestoft.   
Ashby was named after all the ash trees that grew in the village. St Mary was the name of its church so the village eventually became known as Ashby St Mary.  The parish covers an area of almost a square mile at just under 204 hectares.   As at 2006 it comprised about 125 dwellings with a population of approximately 300 inhabitants
 
See some of Ashby's history including pictures and other exhibits supplied mainly by parish residents over the period of 9-11th July 2010. Contributions of any village memorabilia were invited to be submitted and placed on show at a specific village occasion for the purpose. 
It provides information from the 1800s and a snapshot of village life from the early 1900s onwards.


TIMELINE AND FEATURES

- CIRCA 4000-2500 BC
In late February 2011, Mike Harris was ploughing his field in Ashby when he caught sight of an object that turned out to be a Neolithic Axe Head. The Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service in Norwich issued the following information about Mike's find.

The object is a part polished axe. The dimensions are 159 x 72 x 34mm (approx 61/4" long x 27/8" high x 13/8" thick).
It has a rounded polished cutting edge at the widest point with the polish extending up to the mid length. It has a flaked broad and rounded butt. The flint is pale grey, speckled and with little patination, but has scattered spots of iron staining. Apart from a small chip on the cutting edge the axe appears to be complete.
Polished part- polished and flaked axes of this form are characteristic and diagnostic of the Noelithic period when, with the introduction of agriculture there was the need to clear scrub and trees from the land.


                  

     Showing axe head size           Note the chip on left end              Top edge                Top edge - side view

Mike was told the axe head was probably discarded due to the chip on the cutting edge. With thanks to Mike for contributing to part of Ashby's history - it is surely ironic that he was doing with a plough what others did over 4-6000 years ago with axe heads like this one.

- CIRCA 1000 AD
Ashby St Mary was referred to in the Domesday Book when it was drawn up between 1084-86. At that time the parish was known as Ascebei.   
Two principal landowners in the area held parcels of land as a direct tenancy from King William the Conqueror in right of  “Knight’s services", this being the provision of a contingent of armed soldiers when required by the King.  These two chief tenants were Roger Bigot and Godric the Steward.
The next tenant in the hierarchy under Roger Bigot was Robert of Vaux. In turn Robert of Vaux was Sweetman. It seems probable that Sweetman was an Anglo-Saxon and not a Norman since he is recorded in the Domesday Book as having held land in Ascebei before the Norman Conquest. Under Sweetman there were  “10 freemen … at 30 acres. Always 1 plough; meadow, 2 acres”. Sweetman’s holding also included  “7 halves-a-freeman, at 27 acres. Always 1 plough.”
In the other part of Ascebei, the immediate tenant under Godric the Steward was Ralph. Under Ralph there were “6 whole freemen and 6 halves under the patronage of Aslac and Leofric, at 20 acres of land. Always 11/2 ploughs.”  Godric’s land also included parcels mainly in Claxton  “under the patronage of Edwin”  which also brought in a further  “freeman and a half, 5 acres”  in Ascebei.

- 1757 ASHBY MILL
                                                               
                           For a fine scanned photo (in sepia)                      For a larger map of the former
                           of the above picture, click HERE                           Ashby Mill site, click HERE

Ashby St Mary Postmill is recorded as having been constructed in 1757. Evidence shows that until the 1st World War, the windmill (see Gallery below for picture) used to stand opposite the present site of the Ashby St Mary village sign. Information taken from Whites and Kelly’s Directory of Norfolk indicates the Mill was owned by William Young in 1845, by John Rushmore in 1864, by Daniel Burroughs in 1883, by Frederick George Chapman in 1901 and by Albert Arthur Culling in 1916. It is understood that a parishioner’s father, born in 1902, recalled that on a journey from Thurton School to his home in Sandy Lane, witnessed the Mill being pulled down by a traction engine, which also places the existence of the Mill up to 1916 or beyond.

For an extensive history of the Mill including advertisements of sale and recorded owners, this website is recommended -
http://www.norfolkmills.co.uk/Windmills/ashby-st-mary-postmill.html

- 1854
The following entry appears in the History, Gazetteer and Directory of Norfolk, 1854
"Ashby parish contains 249 souls, 58 houses, and 485 acres of land and is situated 3 miles N.N.W. of Loddon, and 71/2 miles S.E. by E. of Norwich. Robert Gilbert. jun., Esq is the chief landowner; there are also several smaller land proprietors, but Sir Chas.H.Ric, Bart is lord of the manor, and he and Sir W.H.Proctor are alternate patrons of the rectory, valued in the King's book at £6 and consolidated with Carleton St. Peter.  The Church, dedicated to St. Mary, is a spacious edifice, with a square tower and three bells. In 1843, it was thoroughly repaired, new windows added, and seatly fitted up with open seats. There are 28 acres of glebe, and the tithes are communted for £176 per annum.
Directory:- Rt. Gilbert, jun.,Esq., the Hall ; Rd. Eldon, wheelwright ; Mrs Amelia Maillet, Ashby House ; Rev. David Pegg, (Baptist) ; Isaac Shreeve, shoemaker ; Wm. Todd, butcher ; Wm Young, corn miller ; and Goe, Basey, Wm. Goodram, Daniel Mansfield, Jas. Mays, and Jac. Smith, (and parish clerk), farmers."

[Source:www.historicaldirectories.org-History, Gazetteer and Directory of Norfolk 1854, Loddon Hundred, page 517]

- 1937
The following entry appears in Kelly's Directory of Norfolk, 1937 (21st) edition:-
"ASHBY ST. MARY (near Norwich) is a village and parish, 71/2 miles from Norwich (Norwich Thorpe being the most convenient station), 3 miles south-west from Buckenham station (by ferry) on the Norwich, Yarmouth and Lowestoft sections of the London and North Eastern railway, and near the navigable Yare, and 31/2 north-west from Loddon, in the Eastern division of the county, Loddon hundred, Loddon and Clavering petty sessional division, Loddon rural district, county court district of Norwich, rural deanery of Brooke, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich.
The church of St. Mary the Virgin is an ancient structure of flint in the Norman and Early English styles, consisting of chancel, nave, south porch and an embattled western tower containing 3 bells; the tower was restored in 1928 : the south porch is a fine specimen of Norman work : the church was restored in 1849, and in 1903 the chancel was new-roofed and repaired : during the progress of the work an ancient aumbry was discovered in the north wall: in 1914 an organ was given by Mrs. Wyndham Gray : the church has 120 sittings.
The register dates from the year 1620.
The living is a rectory, with the vicarage of Thurton annexed, joint net yearly value £327, including 10 acres of glebe, with residence, in the gift of the Governors of Wrekin College, and held since 1934 by the Bev. Thomas Sewell Wontner M.A. of Selwyn College and Ridley Hall, Cambridge.
The poor's allotment consists of about 6 acres, let at £9 yearly.
The principal landowners are R. T. E. Gilbert esq. J.P.; William H. M. Andrews esq. and the Rev. J. J. Woolsey M.A.
The soil is light sandy ; subsoil, sand and brick earth. The chief crops are wheat, oats and barley, sugar beet and market garden produce. The area is 503 acres ; the population in 1931 was 165.
Letters through Norwich, via Thurton. The nearest M. O. office is at Bergh Apton & T. office, Loddon.
     PRIVATE RESIDENTS
Andrews, William H. M., The Lodge  /  Child, Miss, Ross Arden  /   Gilbert, Robert Thomas Edwin J.P., Ashby hall
Ward, Miss, Ross Arden  /   Wontner, Rev. Thomas Sewell M.A. (rector), Rectory
     COMMERCIAL.
Basey-Fisher, George, farmer. Hill farm  /  Catchpole, Leslie Wm., market gardener, Ashby villa
Catchpole, Nelson A., market gardener, Vally farm  /   Cotton, Robert Major, farmer  /   Forder, William, market gardener
Frost, Frank, market gardener  /   Gifford, George, market gardener  /  Harwood, Bertie John, market gardenr. Chapel rd
Hoddy, John, farmer & licensed horse slaughterer; best prices given for live & dead horses & cattle, Hill house. Thurton 23
Hurrell, Arthur. market gardener  /   Parfltt W. & Sons, market gardeners, Grange Garden house
Rich, Reginald Wm. saddler  /   Smith, James, market gardener  /   Watkinson, John Henry, market gardener
Whiles, Charles, market gardener  /   White, Jas. Alfred, wheelwright"

(With acknowledgement to Kelly's Directories Ltd)

PARISH REGISTERS   - Available Soon   
Pages from old Ashby parish registers dating from the 1500's

THE CHURCH OF ST MARY THE VIRGIN, ASHBY ST MARY

      

CHURCH     
Click to see exterior and interior pictures of our church


The church is a grade II* listed building and is one of five churches in the united benefice of Thurton part of the Bramerton group of churches. Ashby St Mary was probably the location of a Roman siting post and is listed in the Little Domesday Book. The church is a mixture of mediaeval styles of architecture having been enlarged, restored or 'improved' over the centuries and may be the location of the Roman siting post and is probably built on Saxon foundations.

The core of the nave is Norman (1066 - 1190) and probably the original small Norman church extended east to the old brown carrstone Quoins. The external flint masonry is stratified and one of the Norman 'slit' windows survives. The greatest legacy from the Norman craftsmen is seen in the beautiful south Norman doorway with its very old door with massive lock which still remains: note two orders of colonnettes and Mass dials etc.

The original Norman Church was extended by the addition of a new c hancel during the Early English period (1190 - 1280). In the north wall are two early English/Norman lancet windows and a priests doorway in the south wall. The elegant Bell tower was built in the 15th century with a small staircase turret. Note the gargoyles forming the drainage from the roof. The masonry of the porch contains Tudor brickwork which protects the south Norman doorway and is late 15th or early 16th century. Inside the church the original wall plates which supported the mediaeval roof are still evident. Although the tower arch has been lowered, the two fine lion corbels upon which the original arch rests can still be seen. A considerable amount of 17th century woodwork still remains, the outstanding feature is the handsome communion rail. The ancient and unusual alms box which has three locks may also date from this period.

The font is probably 17th century with a Jacobean cover and the bench ends are 16th or 17th century. In the sanctuary is a mediaeval aumbry with a more modern door and a mediaeval roundel dated 1604 in the more modern east window. On the outside of the east wall are indications of an original 3 lite window. The ledger slabs on the east wall which list the Lord's Prayer, Ten Commandments and Creed are late 17th century.

There are three bells in the tower which are hung for swing chiming. The oldest tenor bell is mediaeval and dates from 1424/1513 by Richard Brasyer. The others are dated 1631 by W & A Brend and 1708 by Thomas Newman. They were all refurbished to ring on Easter day 2009; the first time all three bells had been heard in over a hundred years. The chamber organ was probably built around 1790/1830 and was rebuilt in 1866 by JW Walker. In 1873 the organ was moved from Godstone in Surrey to Horstead Hall in Norfolk. The organ was acquired by Ashby St Mary in about 1912. The organ was completely refurbished in 2009 revealing a beautiful mahogany case (visible for the first time since 1866) to complement the newly gilded pipes.

The coloured glass window in the south wall is a copy of 'The Light Of The World' by Holman Hunt. See the CHURCH section for further details about this. In the east window is a Swiss/Flemish roundel with angel and shields 16/17th century. The church plate at Ashby St Mary is an Elizabethan chalice and paten dated 1568/9 plus a large pewter flagon probably Jacobean (not in church).   The baptism and burial registers date from 1620 and the marriages register dates from 1766. We can readily trace rectors back to the 13th century.

A sketch of Ashby St Mary church is displayed next to the vestry door and was completed originally as part of 'Views of the Churches in Norfolk, illustrative of Blomefield's history of that county, from original drawings by R Ladbrooke Vol. 1 — Norwich printed & published by IB Ladbkooke Feb 1823'. This particular copy was printed by Rowney & Foster in 1871.
(With acknowledgement to parishioner Arnold Miller)

www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/ashbystmary
www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/AshbyStMary.html

ASHBY ST MARY CHURCH ORGAN

 

Edward Birkbeck must have been a thoughtful man. Not only did he remember his wife's birthday, he actually did something about it two months beforehand.  Sadly two months was not enough for his idea, which was to give his wife a pipe organ in their house in Godstone, Surrey. One of the best organ builders of the day, J W Walker, did offer to have something ready by April 15th 1866, which they achieved by rebuilding an older instrument.  
Seven years later the family moved to Norfolk, and, at a cost of £9, the organ was put on the train to Norwich and re-erected at the new family home, Horstead Hall.

Here it remained for nearly forty years, until presumably the organist had died and the remaining family no longer wanted an organ. In 1912 it arrived at Ashby church where it has been for the last 97 years.

After 143 years of regular use, and nothing beyond tuning, a few repairs and occasional cleaning, it is hardly a surprise that the essential workings were worn out. Rust, rot, and mice had all taken their toll.
Several firms of organ builders were invited to assess the task of restoration. Their inspections told us that originally the organ dated from between 1790 and 1830. It was said to be 'a very special unspoilt instrument' and 'an organ from the end of the classical tradition...a more or less complete historic organ'. It originally had two manuals, but no pedals. A fine Cuban mahogany case had been painted over, firstly with an 'oak' effect and later in 'pine', almost certainly to fit in with the houses where it was installed.
There was some feeling a hundred years or so ago that it would not be seemly for church organs to sound too bright, and a sombre tone characterises church instruments from that period. As an instrument from a secular background, used for home entertainment, the Ashby organ has always had a warm and bright cheerfulness about it. Now that the mahogany has been stripped of the Victorian paint and the pipes regilded to their original splendour, the organ adds a real 'wow factor' to entering the building. And it now sounds even better.  Richard Bower's Norfolk firm beat four others to the contract and the result is a triumph. Let's hope it does another 143 years...
(With acknowledgement to parishioner Arnold Miller)

ASHBY CHURCHYARD
Ashby St Mary Church and Churchyard : Co-ordinates - Lat. N 52:34:04   Long. E 01:26:34  

CHURCHYARD   - Available Soon   
Click to see a plan and in-depth details of gravestones including names, dates and inscriptions

The churchyard is dominated by the utilitarian concrete war memorial on the west side as you approach the porch which lists the parish dead of two world wars.

The tombstones of George and Ann Basey are situated immediately on the east side of the footpath as you approach the porch and have attracted considerable publicity over the last 25 or 30 years.   George (who died in 1876) and his wife Ann (who died in 1868) are shown surrounded by their flocks of geese and turkeys, reminding us of the fact that in that century and earlier, these birds were bred in Norfolk in great quantities. East Anglia holds the credit for the domestication of the goose. In the late autumn before Christmas, whole droves of geese and turkeys could be seen waddling slowly and noisily along the roads to London and the Smithfield market. The flocks could make about 10 miles a day, guided by drovers who were skilled men who had to ensure their arrival in good condition. Apparently nothing could equal these Norfolk reared birds on the London Market where they commanded higher prices for the table than those bred in other parts of England.
The sequel to this story is that an image of Ann Basey and her geese has now been incorporated into the village sign.

(With acknowledgement to parishioner Arnold Miller)

VILLAGE SIGN

      

Commissioned by Ashby St Mary Parish Council to celebrate the millennium, the village sign was unveiled during 2000 (see Gallery below for picture).  Its entire nurture to life and manufacture was fittingly provided by residents of the parish. The particular design of the sign was arrived at in the knowledge that history records a link between the windmill, the Lady and the geese depicted on it, to Ashby St Mary. It has been established that it was the practice in the 18th and 19th centuries to walk geese which had been bred in Norfolk to London in readiness for the Michaelmas trade. For protection their feet were bound with webbing and covered in tar. This journey took some 10 to 14 days and they were fed en route by grazing the corn stubbles.

A carving of a lady with geese is to be found on a tombstone situated in Ashby churchyard (see Gallery below for picture).  Pictures of it have been published in many books and magazines.

(With acknowledgement to parishioner David Catchpole)

POPULATION
At the 1841 Census it is recorded that “263 Souls” resided in the parish.
By 1861 there were 257 Inhabitants. For the next 100 years the population declined gradually.
In 1881 the figure was just over 200.
In 1901 it stood at 176, remaining reasonably static for the next two decades.
The figure dropped to 165 in 1931 falling to a low point of 155 in 1971.
By 1991, due largely to a development of newly constructed dwellings, it had risen to 240 and rose again to 290 by 1998. 
There are currently in the region of 300 inhabitants.

Ashby Family Research Genealogy -
www.any-village.co.uk/surnames.asp?name=AshbyStMary

British Towns and Villages Network -
This site claims to receive around 1.4 milion hits per week. Following an invitation from the network, it now contains a link to the Ashby St Mary website.   www.british-towns.net

UK Villages -
A community website for finding a wide variety of information.
www.ukvillages.co.uk


AROUND ASHBY          
Open this to see a gallery of some pictorial features of Ashby St Mary parish

GALLERY (including accounts and pictures of events since 2007)

2013 - Bishop's X1 v an Ashby X1 Charity Cricket match was held on 27th July between teams of the Bishop of Thetford and Ashby in a 26 overs per side innings. The weather forecast had predicted rain for a large part of the day, but it turned out to be a mainly warm, sunny, summmer day. The Ashby team, which included village guest players, batted first and made a very respectable total of 180 all out after which 'tea' was taken by the palyers.  In reply the Bishop's X1 made 78 and never looked like gaining the upperhand during their innings although a fine caught-and-bowled by the Bishop must surely have meant he went home happy!

                                      
                                               The Ashby X1                                      The Bishop's X1                  

                                  
                                      A fine stop (look closely)                    Ashby's very own 'Barmy Army'?!

                                                           

                                                          Bishop's batsmen watch Ashby fielders 


At the conclusion a barbeque and raffle was held for all the players and the many watching spectators. Other highlights included a 6 into the grounds of Ashby Hall, a 4 which resulted in a 'lost' ball amongst the cars and a dog surprised by another 4 despite minding its own business.

LOOK BELOW - Click on a play arrow to watch some cricketing action*.
In both videos the Bishop's X1 are batting and the Ashby X1 are fielding - one shows a wicket being taken.

Click the centre arrow to start. To view again, click the symbol at the the lower left corner.
To avoid the vocal accompaniment of several excitable children and snatches of spectator converstions, you may wish to turn your volume down or off!
(The assistance of Andy O'Connor is gratefully acknowledged in providing his technical assistance)     
 * Please note - this will operate only if you have suitable software.


2013 - The village Strawberries and Pimm's event held on Friday 28th June took place amidst the wonderful surroundings of the Ashby Cricket Club with its magnificent new pavilion.
The occasion was very popular as ever although the weather for it was decidedly awful being predominantly wet and cool. Nevertheless numbers appeared only just down on the usual turnout, the strawberries and Pimm's went down a treat, and the ever popular raffle was well supported by villagers and guests alike.
With thanlks to the hosts Chris and Anita plus helpers Margaret, Betty, Eve, Wendy, David and Roy - plus Arnold, the master of ceremonies
.  
 


2013 - Annual Parish Meeting

Ashby's roving reporter snapped this picture of democracy at work.
It shows the Annual Parish Meeting in session with the Chairman explaining a point to parishioners.
The Parish Council thanks all those who attended the meeting on 23rd May 2013.


2012 - Strawberries & Pimms Church Fundraising Evening
Another successful annual Strawberries and Pimm's gathering in aid of Ashby Church funds took place on Friday 29th June at the home of hosts Jim and Linda. Despite the cool but fine weather, an impressively large turnout of villagers ensured an enjoyable evening was had by all. A giant tombola, entry ticket draw, raffle, and win-a-bottle-of-spirits resulted in a host of lucky winners. Thanks go to Jim, Linda, organisers Roy and Margaret, David and Betty and all their helpers. (Both pictures below are before most villagers had arrived)

                                
                                         Giant tombola                            The marquee begins to fill



2012 - Visit by Norfolk Church Tours
Norfolk Church Tours visited Ashby St Mary's church on Sunday 17th June. There were approximately 40 visitors who were later entertained to drinks and cakes at the home of Roy & Margaret with helpers from the congregation. The visitors were very impressed not only by our church but also our hospitality and we received donations from them of over £300. (Account kindly supplied by Terry Kitt)

                                


2012 - Ashby residents celebrate the Queen's Silver Jubilee
On Sunday 3rd June some Ashby residents gathered to celebrate Queen Elizabeth ll's silver jubilee, several in their
finest and appropriate attire of red, white and blue. The momentous occasion was hosted by Margaret and Roy who
provided a veritable feast for all the guests that was then followed by renditions of patriotic songs and music, all of
which combined to warm everyone up on the cool, sunless day. Other highlights included the wonderfully decorated
marquee, an impromptu royal flypast of handmade napkin airplanes, and of course a royal toast.


       
        Happiness is a balloon                    Practising their 'royal' waves                  Most of the ensemble
       
        Hosts Roy and Margaret                    Patriotism starts young!                    Explanation welcome!
          
   Celebraters - with empty bottles                 ....the party's over                  Bunting adorned our village sign

2011 - A Hole-ly Mess
Following two heavy spells of rain on Tuesday 13th September, a hole appeared in the road along Low Common. It was extremely hazardous to all users of the road, especially walkers and cyclists during the hours of darkness. One of the parish's roving reporters, Scoop, took the pictures below. Having reported the presence of the hole to our District Councillor
it was filled by 1 p.m. on Thursday 15th September. The photo with the shoe gives an idea of the hole's size - not that the wearer has disappeared down the hole!  

      

2011 - A Successful Arts Festival
Ashby St Mary Church held a varied arts festival over ten days which was opened by Wendy Shaw on Friday 28th August 2011 at the Arts & Crafts Exhibition.   Six successful workshops were held during the festival, covering plant drawing and painting, creative writing and rug making.
On Friday entertainment was provided by Elaine Smith and her talented students Lauren Talford, Charlotte Odell and Ruth Whybrow. A magical performance of a Woodwind Recital of Bach, Wagner and other composers.

On Saturday the Red Beans 'n' Rice New Orleans Revivalist Jazz Band played to a packed church. Audience participation was achieved by The Bands Parade Master leading a parade of the audience down the aisle, all waving parasols to jazz classics. Afterwards food was provided by Jim Archer in the form of giant bangers. A truly superb village event.   The festival ended on Sunday 4th September 2011 with a Festival Service of thanksgiving.

Jazz_organiser    Raring_to_start    Fix_parasols    Young_and_old    Participation    More_participation    Sausages

2011 - Annual Strawberries & Pimms Church Fundraiser
Another wonderful evening with a gathering of parishioners took place on 2nd July. Held at the kind invitation of Arnold at his home in the village, the weather and company, not to mention the strawberries and pimms, were perfect.

                                                     

2011 - Dramatic sunset
Taken towards where The Street meets The Common at the top of the hill, this was the scene at 7.24 on the evening of 16th August. It definitely gives the impression Norwich is on fire.


Above photo in larger size - Distant_sunset      Another photo in large size - Close_up_sunset

2011 - Two Diamonds seen in Ashby!
Ashby St Mary has seen not one but two couples celebrating their diamond wedding recently. Not only that, but coincidentally, they did so on the same day! Jack and Betty Kleeman and Ken and Julie Baish are neighbours in the village where both celebrated 60 years of marriage on Thursday 11th August..
Ken, 81, and Julie, 80, have lived on Mill Road for 21 years while Jack, 84, and Betty, 83, have lived in the village for 46 years. They met the Kleemans during 1991, after moving to Ashby St Mary a year earlier, when both couples happened to be in the same restaurant near Hales. During their conversation they discovered they were both celebrating their 40th wedding anniversaries - and have been friends ever since.

(More about this story appears in the Norwich Evening News of 13th August 2011 or at this link diamond_delight

2010 Proms In The Park (Sandringham) - Russell Watson & The Poringland Singers
Ashby St Mary was represented at Proms in The Park at Sandringham on Sunday 8th August when Poringland Singers backed the principal act, tenor Russell Watson. Ashby residents David Catchpole and Julia Buckland are proud members of the locally acclaimed choir which was honoured to receive an unexpected invitation to perform just 14 days before the big day! After receiving the music score, there was time for only 2 rehearsals for Poringland Singers to perfect their performance of traditional ‘prom’ music and songs.
After singing in front of an audience of over 7000, by far the largest they have played to, Poringland Singers were publicly thanked at the end of the evening for their singing and professionalism – by no less than Russell Watson himself.

1. Watson, Orchestra and Singers  |  2. Watson, Orchestra and Singers  |  3. Watson, Orchestra and Singers

2008 Ashby Parish Council at the Ashby & Thurton Village Hall Family Fun Day
Ashby PC stall  |  Ashby PC assist  |  Ashby PC listen  |  Ashby & Thurton residents tug-of-war

2007 Ashby Strawberries and Bubbly evening
the garden  |  deep in conversation

2007 Ashby Church Fete
in the shade  |  raffle winners  |  a roaring trade  |  hoopla action  |  chilling out



To submit a picture for inclusion in the Gallery, please contact the Parish Clerk or Webmaster.  Anyone offering a picture for the Gallery does so on the condition the Parish Council may determine whether it is included in this Gallery.
 
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